Projects

We were all Agile: Agile Greece Summit 2015

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I spent last Friday in Athens in a conference taking place for the first time in Greece. Agile Greece Summit 2015 was the first of its series in Greece and I do hope that more will come. Not only the speaker roaster sounded very promising on the announcement, but it proved an exciting one indeed. From Spotify to Swiss Postal services and from Vodafone to IBM, every session proved revealing.

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Photo Courtesy of Jason Carter @Flickr

I did not have the chance to follow every speaker since the programme was deployed into two parallel sessions, but I did manage to have a full day of interesting discussions, provoking arguments and inspiring ideas.

I particularly enjoyed the presentation from Spotify, on “Why autonomy is at the heart of agility”. Kristian Lindwall & Cliff Hazell talked about Spotify and the autonomy of every worker. You can get an idea of their talk from a previous presentation you can find here.

I liked the approach of Gunther Verheyen, from Scrum.org for scalling scrum, although before we scale scrum we first have to impelment it successfuly and to really hone it. If you are new to agile and scrum by the way, Scrum.org is an excellent starting point, which also offers a range of Scrum Courses and Certifications.

Ben Linders, a world class agile expert, showed how using different exercises can help you to get more value out of agile retrospectives. You can find his presentation along with other very useful material in his web site.

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Niels Pflaeging at Stage

Claudio Perrone, another speaker with many capacities and even more skills, presented PopcornFlow, his new model for continuous evolution through rapid experimentation. His web site is full of interesting information and tools.

But probably the real revelation (at least for me) was Niels Pflaeging. It wasn’t just his relaxed American style, nor his humour and provoking (to some) language. More than that, it was his profound ideas and fascinating arguments that engaged the whole audience. Niels is worth reading. His short and nicely illustrated book that we got as a freebie proved a great companion in my way home. Niels has a whole universe of books, white papers, videos and presentations and it’s worth looking at every one of them. (Start here).

All in all, it was a great workshop and I hope we’ll have the chance to build further the agile community and knowledge. Maybe some day we’ll manage to even actually use it in Greece.

PERICLES project wins Best Poster Award at IDCC 2014

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This post was originally published to Pericles Project web site. Visit it for more on Pericles Project.
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(c) All rights reserved by Digital Curation Centre (DCC)

San Francisco is a beautiful city. With at least 2 to 3 major tech events taking place here every week and a whole bunch of other exciting stuff from business meetups to live jazz, you never get bored. From Monday the 24th to Thursday 27th it hosted the 9th International Data Curation Conference with the eloquent title “Commodity, catalyst or change-agent? Data-driven transformations in research, education, business & society”. A well established conference which attracted this year about 230 delegates from libraries, university labs and research institutions from all over the world including some heavy names like The British Library, Microsoft Research, Elsevier, NSF and top universities from N. America, Europe and Australia.

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Horizon2020 calling. Ready?

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imagesJanuary is a month full of challenges. The new year finds Europe (at least its South) still in a deep crisis. Not only an economic crisis, but also a political one. Unfortunately, despite some good news, one swallow does not make a spring. But instead of moaning we can focus on new ideas and opportunities. Read the rest of this entry »

A new Horizon to 2020

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I was lucky enough to visit Paris, just a few weeks before Christmas. After a long walk by the Seine, enjoying the bright lights of this big city, I sat at one of those typical bistros, by the river. As it happens many times, when I’m travelling alone, I thought back to my first trips to Europe, when I started working in EU research projects.

Although I originally got involved in research and development (R&D) projects back in 1999, my major work started about 7 years ago, with the first calls of the FP7 programme, so I cannot really claim decades of experience in the subject. Nevertheless, I had the privilege of working in a few quite big and significant projects with some of the best scientists and researchers in Europe. Read the rest of this entry »